Pete Bax
BOATMANS WALTZ A BARCAROLE
By: Pete Bax
Catalog ID: 544249   Duration: 0:49   Tempo: Medium   BPM: 107   Vocal: Instrumental
Genre: Sports Music | Sports Network TV | Electro-Orchestral
Social Media Link: http://www.audiosparx.com/sa/archive/Sports/Sports-Network-TV-Electro-Orchestral/Boatmans-Waltz-a-Barcarole/544249
This was written for boating style programmes every one loves messing about in boats and the waltz captures the wind the waves and the boat, three four time. This can be used for cartoons, films, sports, ringtones, the inspiration for this is a Barcarole or boating song that fits into today classic   Keywords: aquatic boating cruising deep-sea marine maritime navigating ocean going oceanic pelagic rowing sailing sea-loving seafaring seagoing classical yachting



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Long Description: Boatmans Waltz a Barcarole, Sports Music, Sports Network TV Electro-Orchestral, music for video, license music and music for videos

Keywords: Other barcaroles include: the three "Venetian Gondola Songs" from Mendelssohn's Songs without Words, Opp. 19, 30 and 62; the "June" barcarole from Tchaikovsky's The Seasons; Charles-Valentin Alkan's barcarole from the Op. 65 Troisième recueil de chants; Béla Bartók's "Barcarolla" from Out of Doors; several examples by Anton Rubinstein, Mily Balakirev, Alexander Glazunov, Edward MacDowell, and Ethelbert Nevin; and the collection of thirteen for solo piano by Gabriel Fauré. In the 20th century, examples include: Agustín Barrios's Julia Florida; the second movement of Villa-Lobos's Trio No. 2 (1915) (which contains a Berceuse-Barcarolla); the first movement of Francis Poulenc's Napoli Suite for solo piano (1925); George Gershwin's Dance of the Waves (1937); Ned Rorem's three Barcaroles for piano, composed in Morocco (1949); "The Kings' Barcarole" from Leonard Bernstein's Candide (1956); and "Agony" from Stephen Sondheim's Into the Woods.
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